Tepary Bean Hummus with Chile de Arbol

This deeply spicy, smoky hummus is a warming twist on the staple spread.  Serve with a plate of fresh vegetables for dipping or on toasted crostinis with caramelized onions and fresh cilantro.  Sesame seeds can easily be replaced with equal portions of tahini and peanut butter can substitute for whole peanuts.  If you prefer a milder dish, start with just 2-3 chiles de arbol.

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon + 1/4 cup of olive oil
1 medium white onion, minced
5 cloves garlic, lightly smashed
8-10 chiles de arbol
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
5 whole cloves
1 teaspoon oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/3 cup roasted peanuts
1/4 cup sesame seeds
1 cup of water
1 1/2 cups cooked tepary beans
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
Zest and juice of one lemon
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

To make: Add 1 tablespoon of olive oil and saute onions and garlic in a medium-sized skillet on medium heat for 4-5 minutes, until the onions are lightly brown. Add the chiles de arbol, peppercorns, cloves, thyme, peanuts, and sesame seeds and cook stirring throughout for 2-3 minutes.

Simmer tepary beans in the water on medium-high heat for 5-7 minutes until the liquid is reduced by half, then add salt and stir in onion mixture.

Pour the mixture into a blender or food processor. Add the lemon juice and zest along with the remaining 1/4 cup of olive oil, and puree until smooth and consistent. If necessary drizzle additional water (a couple tablespoons at a time) and puree until smooth. Garnish with olive, oil and fresh herbs or toasted sesame seeds.

See also www.ediblebajaarizona.com/tepary-bean-hummus-with-chile-de-arbol




    Italian Tepary Beans and Rice with Caramelized Fennel and Spicy Sausage

An Italian spin on the classic red beans and rice, this dish works well with the toothsome texture of tepary beans. Plump and chewy jasmine rice is a beautiful accompaniment with this dish and is complemented further by small pat of butter melted over the rice just before serving.

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons of olive oil
½ pound spicy sausage (about two large sausage links), sliced
1 pound of fennel, cored and thinly sliced
½ large sweet onion, diced
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
½ teaspoon dried thyme
1 cup water
3 cups of cooked white tepary beans
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1/4 cup of minced parsley
2 cups cooked rice (preferably jasmine)

In a large skillet add one tablespoon of oil on medium heat, saute sausage slices until lightly seared on both sides. Drain sausages on a paper towel and reserve for later.

Add the fennel, onions, bay leaf, crushed red pepper, and thyme to the pan and saute for 12-15 minutes, stirring until the fennel is golden brown and almost caramelized. Add salt and garlic, saute for another minute. Add the water along with the cooked white tepary beans. Stir to combine and simmer on medium heat for 4-5 minutes. Add sausage and minced parsley. Serve with cooked jasmine rice.

 
                                       Rio Del Rey Refried Beans

In northern Mexico and in American Tex-Mex cuisine, refried beans are usually prepared with Pinto beans, but many other varieties of bean are used in other parts of Mexico, such as black or red beans. In this recipe a mixture of Pinto and Anasazi beans is used to create a delicious dish. You can use less oil or substitute bacon fat or lard, depending on your dietary needs. The recipe uses powdered spices to reduce preparation time. Alternatively, you can place ½ cup of finely chopped onion and a finely minced clove of garlic in the beans as you cook them. You may cut the recipe in half to make approximately 3 cups of refried beans.

 Ingredients

- 1 pound package of Rio Del Rey Refried Bean Mix (Anasazi and Pinto Beans)
- 2 Tbs onion powder
- 1 Tbs garlic powder
- 1 Tbs cumin powder
- 6 ounces olive oil
- salt to taste (1-2 tsp)

 Directions                                                                                                   

1. Place the beans in a colander and rinse them in cold water.

2. Put the rinsed beans in a large bowl and cover them with 6 cups of water. Let the beans soak overnight. (After soaking, you will have 7 ½ cups of beans.)

3. Drain the water from the beans and place them in a large cooking pot.

4. Add 8 cups of water to the beans.

5. Bring the beans to a boil, and let them boil gently for 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to low so that the beans will cook gently.

6. Add the onion powder, garlic powder and cumin to the beans and stir to combine.

7. Cover the pot and continue to slowly simmer for 1 hour and 45 minutes.

8. Drain the beans, reserving the bean cooking liquid.

9. Place the olive oil in a large frying pan over medium high heat.

When the oil is shimmering (it is too hot if the oil begins to smoke), add the drained beans. Use a spatula to mix the beans and cook them for 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium.

10. Use a potato masher to mash the beans. The longer you mash, the smoother the beans will become. Add 1 cup of the reserved bean liquid to the beans and continue mashing to fully incorporate the liquid. You can adjust how thick or thin you want your beans, by the amount of liquid you mix into the beans.

11. Add salt to taste and enjoy!

Makes 6 ½ cups


                               Rio Zape Beans with Toasted Chile Sauce

Slow Cooker Method

By Fairmont Market • February 18, 2011

Serves 6-8

1 pound dried Rio Zape beans rinsed, or substitute black or Anasazi beans
5 dried chiles (for mild spiciness use 2 anchos and 3 negros, for a little more heat, substitute in some guajillos)
6 sun dried tomato halves (not in oil)
5 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
3 tablespoons neutral oil such as grape seed
5 cups water
sour cream for serving
cilantro for serving

Heat a skillet and toast the chiles about one minute on each side until they puff up and become fragrant. Also heat the garlic cloves until they start to blacken. Meanwhile remove the stems and seeds from the chiles and immerse them in 2 cups hot water, along with the sun dried tomatoes. When the garlic cloves are done, peel them and put them in a blender. Toast the cumin and fennel seeds in the skillet for about one minute and add these to the blender, along with the cinnamon and cocoa powder. Spoon in the softened chiles and tomatoes. Add one cup of the soaking liquid, strained. Blend until you have a smooth paste.
Heat oil in a pan and add the chile paste. Cook, stirring for about 5 minutes until it has darkened in color and become very fragrant. Rinse the blender jar with the remaining soaking liquid and add to pan. If using, transfer to your slow cooker. Add the beans and 3 more cups of water. Cook on high for 4 to 6 hours (the cooking time will depend on the dryness of the beans and the slow cooker model). When the beans are soft, add salt to taste.
Serve with a dollop of sour cream and sprigs of cilantro



                                Jacob's Cattle and Anasazi Bean Salad

This salad was developed for the Fallbrook To Table dinner sponsored by CCOF (California Certified Organic Farmers) on October 17, 2015 at Kool Ranch. It featured produce from 15 North San Diego County organic farmers. Created by Chef Jesse Genovese and Bruce Hecker, our beans were featured in two dishes- Mole Braised Rio Del Rey Pinto Beans* and the above salad.

You are welcome to use the ingredients below to reconstruct this salad. The chef did not reveal all of his secrets- but let's say the salad was delightful. Let us know what you did to recreate the recipe.

Use a mixture of half and half- Cooked Jacob's Cattle and Anasazi beans

Prepare Organic lime and lemongrass dressing

Add cilantro, mint, macadamia nuts, oven dried tomatoes, caramelized custard apples.

 * Rio Del Rey Organic Pinto Beans, bay leaf, oregano, roasted Joe E Parker peppers, dark chocolate, espresso.  Use cilantro and lime juice as toppers.

Jacob’s Cattle Bean Soup with Kale and Chevre

This is a delicious and hearty soup using the gorgeous Jacob’s Cattle beans that we grow. The heavy cream helps to bind the beans and to make the soup thicker, so we recommend not using any low-fat substitutes. Make sure to save any leftovers because after you serve this for a winter dinner party, it is even better the next day. It also freezes well. Recipe adapted from LocalHarvest.org

Ingredients

2 cups Jacob's Cattle beans rinse and soak overnight (3 parts water to 1 part beans, soaking water reserved)
1 onion diced or use 4 shallots
2 cloves garlic finely chopped
2 bay leaves
1 Tb dried thyme
1 tsp red chili flakes
 salt to taste
2 Tb olive oil
1 carrot diced
1 stalk celery diced
1 1/2 cup tomatoes coarsely chopped, or use tomato puree when fresh is unavailable
1 cup roasted red peppers chopped
1 bunch kale stemmed and chopped
1 cup heavy cream
1 1/2 cup soft goat cheese
1 tsp black pepper freshly ground
kosher salt

Instructions

Prepare the beans, soaking them over night.

Put the beans and the reserved soaking water in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil for 5 minutes, then reduce the heat to a gentle simmer, slightly covered.  Add the yellow onion or shallots, garlic, bay leaves, thyme and chili flakes.  Cook about 1 hour, until the beans are to your liking in texture and flavor. Do not add the salt until the beans are softened -about halfway through cooking.

While the beans cook, heat the olive oil over medium heat in another saucepan and cook the carrot and celery until the mixture becomes soft but don’t allow to brown. Stir in the black pepper, tomatoes, red peppers and kale of your choice. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes until it all becomes tender.

When the beans are finished, add in the vegetable mixture. Cook for about 20 minutes to meld flavors, then add the heavy cream, goat cheese and black pepper. Cook for 15 minutes more and season to taste with salt.



                                 Appalachian Cider-Baked Beans

This version is hardy enough to make a meal in itself. The cider sweetens the beans and adds bloom to their own natural fragrance.

Ingredients
           3 cups dry Jacob’s Cattle Beans
           1 bottle (750 ml) semisweet hard cider, or 3 cups fresh cider
           1/2 pound salt pork, thinly sliced (or slab bacon)
           2 small yellow onions
           6 tablespoons sorghum, or 1/2 cup molasses
           1 tablespoon dry mustard
           2 teaspoons salt

 Instructions

1. Pick over the beans and discard any stones or misshapen beans. Rinse well and place in a large bowl. Add cold water to cover by 3 inches, cover, and let soak for 12 hours.

2. Drain the beans and transfer to a heavy saucepan. Add the cider and bring slowly to a boil over medium heat. Boil gently, uncovered, for about 30 minutes. Remove from the heat and drain the beans, reserving the cider.

3. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

4. Layer half of the salt pork slices on the bottom of a 2-quart ceramic bean pot or other deep baking dish. Spoon the beans into the bean pot, then bury the onions in the beans. In a small saucepan, combine the sorghum, mustard, and salt and place over medium heat to dissolve the mustard and salt. Pour the hot mixture evenly over the beans, and top with the remaining salt pork slices. Pour in the reserved cider and add hot water as needed to cover the beans. Cover the bean pot.

5. Bake for about 4 hours, then uncover the pot and add more water if the beans seem too dry. Re-cover and continue to bake until the beans are tender, 1 to 2 hours longer. The timing will depend upon the age of the beans. Serve hot directly from the pot.

Adapted from “An Apple Harvest-Recipes-Orchard  by Frank Browning and Sharon Silva

 

                                  Cider and Bacon Baked Beans

1 lb. dry Jacob’s Cattle beans
10 oz. thick-cut bacon, medium diced (8 slices)
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
6 cups chicken broth
1-1/2 Tbs. dry mustard
1/4 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
1/8 tsp. ground cloves
Freshly ground black pepper
1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and small diced (7-1/2 oz.)
1 cup apple cider
1/4 cup maple syrup
1/4 cup ketchup
1/2 tsp ground marjoram
2 tsp. cider vinegar (optional)
salt

Soak beans overnight. Drain the beans well, tilting the colander instead of shaking it to gently extract the water and protect the bean’s skins.

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 300°F.

Cook the bacon in a 5- to 6-quart Dutch oven over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 8 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and with a slotted spoon transfer the bacon to a small bowl. Pour off the fat, reserving 3 Tbs.

Set the pot over medium heat and add the onion and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, until soft and golden, about 7 minutes. Add the broth, mustard, nutmeg, cloves, and 1 tsp. pepper. Stir to combine. Add the beans and bring just to a simmer over medium-high heat. Cover and bake until the beans are easy to bite into but still a little mealy in texture, 45 to 60 minutes.

Stir in the reserved bacon and the apple, cider, maple syrup, ketchup, and marjoram, and bake, uncovered, until the beans are fully tender, 30 to 60 minutes more. Cool to room temperature, cover, and refrigerate overnight.To finish, bring to a simmer, uncovered, over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low and continue to simmer until the sauce is reduced to the consistency of thin gravy, stirring occasionally so the bottom doesn’t burn, 40 to 60 minutes. Stir in the vinegar (if using) and season the beans to taste with salt and pepper.

2 cups tepary beans
2 Tbs olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
3 Tbs chopped garlic
1 ½ cups diced squash- use one or a combination- chayote, green, yellow, butternut
1 ½ cups chopped carrots
1 cup chopped, roasted pasilla chiles, peeled and seeded
1 Tbs chopped fresh epazote or 1Tbs dried oregano
2 tsp ground cumin
1 bay leaf
6 cups vegetable broth or water
1 tsp salt
½ tsp fresh ground black pepper
¼ cup cilantro leaves for garnish (optional)


1. Rinse and sort beans, discarding any rocks or broken beans. Cover beans with water and soak overnight. Drain and rinse beans.


2. In a large pot over medium high heat add the oil. Then add onions. Stir onions occasionally until lightly browned on edges and they are translucent.


3. Stir in garlic, carrots, chiles, epazote or oregano, cumin, bay leaf, and pre-soaked beans. Pour in six cups stock or water. Beans should be one inch under the liquid.


4. Bring to a boil for 5 minutes then reduce heat to a low simmer with pot lid slightly ajar to allow for evaporation.


5. After 1 1/2 hours, add the squash, salt and pepper. Continue to cook until the beans are tender. Add more water, as needed, if the beans look dry.


Serves 8

Green Chile Tepary Bean Stew

(adapted from thegardenkitchen.org)

1/2 pound dried Mayocoba Beans or 1 ¼ cup (soaked overnight)
1 quart vegetable or chicken stock
3 cups water
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped carrots
1 cup chopped ham
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dried oregano
2- cloves of garlic, finely minced
1 minced roasted jalapeno, seeded (optional)
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)
salt and pepper to taste
garnish with cilantro and chopped red pepper


1. Soak the Mayocoba beans in about 4 cups water overnight.  Rinse well before adding to the soup. (Note - some people prefer using the bean soaking liquid - adjust the amount of water you add as necessary).


2. Add the water and stock to a medium sized pot. Add the beans.


3. Bring the beans to a boil for 5 minutes then reduce heat to a low simmer.


4. Add all the ingredients except the salt.  Cook covered with the lid slightly ajar to allow for evaporation.  There should just be small bubbles formed on the surface as the beans cook.


5. After 45 minutes add the salt. Begin with ½ tsp.


6. As the beans cook, adjust liquid with more water or stock as needed, until beans are tender or to your liking.  Adjust salt as needed.


Garnish with cilantro and red pepper or what you enjoy!  Makes about 6 servings.

Mayocoba (Peruvian) Bean Soup

1 lb dried Anasazi beans
1 quart canned Vegetable broth
1 quart water
1 medium green pepper, diced
1 medium onion, diced
1 banana pepper, diced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp ground cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp cardamom
1 tsp salt
1 tsp black pepper
Optional:  2 cups diced ham chunks


Preparation


Place everything into slow cooker and cook on low for 8 hours (a couple of hours less than what I would normally cook pinto beans for, a feature of this particular bean) or according to manufacturer's directions until beans are soft but not mushy.


Serve over fresh cornbread.


Nutrition:per 1 cup (without ham or cornbread):  Calories: 234  Protein: 14g  Carbs: 40g  Fat: 1g Fiber: 7g


Weight Watchers Points:   4


Since the Anasazis lived in Utah, we always used to cook these beans in school when we studied them. With them we had an "Anasazi Feast" and kids could only bring foods that the Anasazis actually ate!

Our Recipes

Awesome Anasazi Beans

1 cup Anasazi beans, dry, picked over and rinsed (1 cup dry beans makes 2 ½ cups cooked.)      
1 medium onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 bay leaf
1 jalapeno or other pepper, skin and seeds removed, then finely chopped
6 cups vegetable stock, chicken stock, or water (or combinations of your choice)
salt, to taste


minced green onions or cilantro leaves, grated Cotija or Parmesan cheese for garnish


Directions


Cover the beans in water and soak overnight, allowing extra water for expansion. Drain, rinse in cold
water. Add stock or water to equal 6 cups. Pour into pot.


Add remaining ingredients except salt and bring to a boil. Boil 5 minutes. Cover, with lid slightly ajar,  at a low simmer for 1- 1.5 hours, or until beans are tender. Halfway through cooking , season with salt to taste. Add more liquid as needed if beans begin to dry out. Serve hot, garnished with green onion and/or cilantro, and cheese.

beans.com

Customer Service 760-749-8177 (Business hours Mon-Sat 9am-5pm PST)

30966 Cole Grade Road, Valley Center, CA 92082-3805 us

Italian Tepary Beans and Rice with Carmelized Fennel and Spicy Sausage

An Italian spin on the classic red beans and rice, this dish works well with the toothsome texture of tepary beans. Plump and chewy jasmine rice is a beautiful accompaniment with this dish and is complemented further by small pad of butter melted over the rice just before serving.


Ingredients:
2 tablespoons of olive oil
½ pound spicy sausage (about two large sausage links), sliced
1 pound of fennel, cored and thinly sliced
½ large sweet onion, diced
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
½ teaspoon dried thyme
1 cup water
3 cups of cooked white tepary beans (use 1 cup soaked dry beans)
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cloves garlic, finely minced
1/4 cup of minced parsley
2 cups cooked rice (preferably jasmine)


In a large skillet add one tablespoon of oil on medium heat, saute sausage slices until lightly seared on both sides. Drain sausages onto a paper towel and reserve for later.
Add the fennel, onions, bay leaf, crushed red pepper, and thyme to the pan and saute for 12-15 minutes, stirring until the fennel is golden brown and almost caramelized. Add the other tbs of oil as needed. Add salt and garlic, saute for another minute. Add the water along with the cooked white tepary beans and  sausage. Stir to combine and simmer on medium heat for 25 minutes or longer to combine the flavors. Add the minced parsley. Serve with cooked jasmine rice.

2 cups dried, mixed tepary beans
6 cups water
½  tsp salt
½  tsp black peppercorns
½  tablespoon whole cumin seeds
½  tablespoon whole coriander seeds
1/8 cup olive oil
½ tsp salt
½ fresh lime, juiced


Rinse and sort through beans. Cover with water and allow to soak over night. Drain and rinse beans. Add beans to cooking pot and add the water. Bring to a boil for 10 minutes, then slowly simmer for 1½ hours, until beans are tender. Adjust water as needed if beans begin to dry out. Add the salt.


Preheat oven to 400oF. Roast black peppercorns, cumin and coriander seeds on a small baking sheet for 5 minutes. Grind toasted seeds in a spice grinder or clean coffee grinder.


Drain beans and reserve cooking water. Combine cooked beans, 2 cups of reserved water, olive oil, and fresh lime juice. Puree until smooth. Makes 5 cups.

Mixed Tepary Bean Dip

2 cups cooked white tepary beans
Reserved liquid from cooking the beans
1-2 cloves garlic (or more!)
3-4 Tbsp lemon juice
2-3 Tbsp olive oil
1-2 Tbsp tahini
1 tsp salt


In a blender or food processor, add the beans and garlic. Blend with enough liquid to make a
frosting -like consistency. Next add the lemon, olive oil, tahini, and salt to taste


Hummus Variations
The traditional taste of hummus comes from tahini, a ground sesame seed paste.
When another nut or seed is used in place of tahini, the flavor changes dramatically. Mike Sheedy has tried other seeds/nuts of the southwest with good results. In exchange for tahini, try:
  2 Tbsp shelled roasted sunflower seeds
  ¼ cup roasted shelled pine nuts


Tepary Bean Hummus

(From Mike Sheedy, inspired by his wife and mother, 4-6 servings)

2 cups dry Pinto Beans*
1 quart Vegetable or Chicken Broth
2 cups water
4 slices Bacon, diced (substitute 2 Tbs olive or canola oil for a vegetarian soup)
3 small Potatoes, peeled .and quartered
1 large Onion, peeled and quartered
2 stalks Celery, cut in 2-inch lengths
4 cloves Garlic, minced
1 roasted Jalapeno Pepper minced (seeds removed)
1 roasted Pasilla Pepper minced (seeds removed)
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp coriander
1 cup chopped Chard or Kale (center stems removed)
½ tsp salt
* 1 cup dry Pinto beans makes 2.5 cups cooked.


1. Soak pinto beans overnight. Place in a colander and drain, then rinse the beans in cold water and drain again.


2. In a food processor or blender, coarsely chop two of the three potatoes.  Add the onion, celery and garlic and pulse until finely chopped.


3. In a large saucepan, cook bacon over medium heat until browned.   If making vegetarian beans, omit the bacon and add 2 tbs of olive oil to the pan over medium heat.


4. Add chopped vegetables, roasted peppers, cumin, and coriander to the saucepan with the browned bacon (or olive oil). Cook about 5 minutes stirring frequently, until the onions are softened.


5. Put the beans in a large pot, cover with water/stock, and bring to a boil. Boil gently for 5 minutes then loosely cover and reduce heat to a low simmer. Add more liquid, as needed, to keep the beans from drying out.


6. Add the vegetable-bacon mixture to the simmering pot of beans. Simmer for 50 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Then add ½ tsp of salt.


7. Cut the remaining quartered, small potato into small cubes, and add to the simmering soup. Cook an additional 20 minutes.


8. Add the chopped chard or kale to the soup. Heat an additional 5 minutes or until chard is tender. Adjust salt to taste. Serve.


For a spicier soup, add a minced roasted Serrano pepper along with the other peppers. For a milder version omit the Jalapeno pepper.


Pintos, Potatoes and Green Pepper Soup
Anasazi Bean Soup

4 slices BACON, diced
2 small POTATOES, peeled and quartered
1 large ONION, peeled and quartered
2 stalks CELERY, cut in 2-inch lengths
2 cloves GARLIC
4 ½ cups cooked*  Anazasi Beans
2 cans or 14.5 oz. each CHICKEN BROTH
¼ cup chopped PARSLEY
SALT and PEPPER to taste
* 1 cup dry beans makes 2 ¼ cups cooked


Preparation


In a large saucepan, cook bacon over medium heat until browned. Meanwhile, in food processor or blender, coarsely chop potatoes.  Add onion, celery and garlic and pulse until finely chopped. Add chopped vegetables to browned bacon. Cook about 5 minutes stirring frequently.


Puree half of the beans and ½ cup water until smooth.  Add pureed beans, remaining whole beans and chicken broth to the vegetable-bacon mixture in saucepan. Bring to a boil; cover and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add parsley, salt and pepper to taste.


Makes 8 cups and serves 6-8

Slow Cooker Anasazi Beans

(recipe by Glenna Anderson Muse)